Marketing

Diving Into In-Housing with MightyHive

 

Last week, the events team had the pleasure of coordinating an intimate dinner on behalf of MightyHive, a global leader in advanced marketing and advertising technologies, at Birdsong in San Francisco’s SOMA neighborhood. The event was well-timed to take place directly after AdExchanger’s Programmatic I/O, where MightyHive was participating and held a presence with their booth.

The night began with cocktail hour and canapés, with guests happy to mingle and unwind after their considerable day at Programmatic. Before inviting everyone to take their seats, MightyHive President of the Americas Emily Del Greco presented welcome remarks and housekeeping notes. Once everyone took a seat in the warm and focused atmosphere of the first floor space, attendees listened to a fireside chat between Emily and Electronic Arts Global Head of Media Belinda Smith.

During the discussion, Belinda and Emily looked back at their careers to trade lessons they’ve learned over the combined 30+ years they share in sales, marketing, and strategy experience. They debated the rewards (increased transparency, control of data, faster execution) and risks (steep learning curve, talent, startup cost) associated with in-house marketing. They marveled at how far in-house agency penetration has come even just in the past 10 years. Toward the end of the chat, it was clear attendees were intrigued by Belinda and Emily’s experiences and hoped to dive deeper into their own in-housing exposure during the Q & A session.

Before heading upstairs for the five-course meal, Emily suggested, “Of course talent is just one component of in-housing—I welcome you to discuss other challenges and opportunities that you have found along the way. Support each other, learn from each other, and share your wisdom.”

After the fireside, more than 15 MightyHive Partners were treated to a delectable tasting menu featuring dishes inspired by the Pacific Northwest. Birdsong, a recent recipient of the coveted Michelin Star honor, appeared to have its service down to a science as evidenced by the harmonious presentation of each plate. Wild boar, aged duck with mustard greens and Sonoma lamb were just a few of the mouthwatering items that graced the menu for the night. Conversation flowed as smoothly as the grilled butter atop the Peruvian purple cornbread, and topics rotated between specific in-housing accounts to the process as a whole.

Guests walked away from the night with inspiration from fascinating speakers along with new tactics for their brands’ in-housing strategy. As a parting gift, MightyHive gave each attendee a branded smart home plug that guests seemed eager to get home and test out.

Looking for help with planning your next event? Connect with us at events@credpr.com.

 

Welcome to the Experience Economy

Experiential marketing has been all the rage this year, partially fueled by the growing challenge of engaging hard-to-reach millennials. That said, are branded Ferris wheels really what's necessary to stay relevant? (We’re talking about Snap’s latest ad at Cannes.)

According to recent Eventbrite research, experiences trump things, with 3 in 4 millennials choosing to spend money on an experience rather than a material item. For instance, Americans attend more live events than ever before, looking for that unique authenticity found through in-person engagements.

The millennial generation has effectively changed the game for brands, who have to think more creatively (and authentically) in order to reach consumers and survive. Here are three of the top approaches utilized by brands to make a lasting impression:

  1. Host an event. Putting on your own event is a great way to engage your network. Make sure you know who your audience is in order to communicate with them in a way that’s meaningful - and fun.

  2. Experiential marketing. While social media engagement and the “fun” factor are great, forgo the Ferris wheel and instead, focus on creating an interactive connection with your audience. Experiential marketing is a two-way conversation and can offer an invaluable space to engage consumers.

  3. Guerrilla marketing. Guerrilla tactics are an unconventional, out-of-the-box way to achieve higher impact and visibility at a lower cost. By introducing an element of surprise, guerrilla marketing has high potential for virality, helping to amplify brand engagement both online and offline.

Interested in learning more? Here are 7 guerrilla marketing examples to inspire your next campaign.

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Branding vs. Marketing - What Comes First?

When it comes to startups, entrepreneurs tend to focus on developing a minimum viable product. Once early adopters' minimal needs are satisfied, the focus shifts to marketing the product in order to grow users.

But what about branding?  

A common misconception is that branding is only about the logo and design. While branding does consist of what the public sees, it’s more about how they perceive. Marketing and branding are not interchangeable, and below is a closer look at what distinguishes the two from each other:

  1. Branding is strategic; marketing is tactical. To put it plainly, branding is who you are and marketing is how you build awareness. While marketing focuses on positioning your product or service, branding is the process of building your personality, voice and message into your company’s DNA.

  2. Marketing activates buyers; branding creates loyalists. Marketing’s focus is driving user action (e.g. clicking on a link). Branding goes beyond customer acquisition and focuses on turning customers into advocates.

  3. You drive your marketing, but customers determine your branding. You hold the power over your tone and content; however, the customer ultimately defines your brand - and their perception of your company influences what they share with their network.

Thus, while marketing and branding go hand-in-hand, branding is what ultimately drives your marketing campaigns and shapes how you do business. Before you make the shift from product to marketing, be sure to consider how you want your company to be perceived, what your vision is and why your product or company exists.

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Interested in learning more about the difference between marketing and branding?

Check out this article.